Context and the Ambiguity of Images

In a recent post that draws on the writings of Susan Sontag, Sarah Hromack creates a somewhat larger context for thinking about the contemporary use of images by professionals and amateurs.  Her post includes a link to the salon.com article by Aaron Kinney about the controversial representations of flood victims in Louisiana and Mississippi. The Kinney article is informative and provides a far more nuanced discussion of the relation of captions to images than one finds in the many blog posts related to this story.

There’s also a rich and comprehensive online research project on the history, practice, and ethical responsibilities of photojournalists on the Imaging Famine website and in a related Guardian exhibition which closes on 9 Sep 05.

4 thoughts on “Context and the Ambiguity of Images

  1. Regarding Katrina

    In Regarding the Pain of Others, her reappraisal of the “intersection [between] news, art, and understanding in the contemporary depiction of war and disaster,” Susan Sontag examines Here is New York, the exhibition of photographs documenting the destr…

  2. Regarding Katrina

    In Regarding the Pain of Others, her reappraisal of the “intersection [between] news, art, and understanding in the contemporary depiction of war and disaster,” Susan Sontag examines Here is New York, the exhibition of photographs documenting the destr…

  3. Compound Interest

    Both Timothy Quigley (Asymptote) and Todd Walker (Gallery Hopper) have linked to the entry below—thanks, sirs—and built upon my initial thoughts. Quigley directs us to the Imaging Famine project, which turns a critical lens on the representation of fam…

  4. Compound Interest

    Both Timothy Quigley (Asymptote) and Todd Walker (Gallery Hopper) have linked to the entry below—thanks, sirs—and built upon my initial thoughts. Quigley directs us to the Imaging Famine project, which turns a critical lens on the representation of fam…

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